Friend Friday: What’s in a comment?

This week Katy from ModlyChic and the rest of the group are discussing criticism, comments and how to be truthful but constructive. Remember to check out Katy’s post for a list of all the other bloggers participating.

1. Do you allow comments on your blog? Why or why not? Yes. I allow comments, because, I want to open up a chance for readers to dialogue with me. I love getting comments (who wouldn’t?) Also, if a reader has a question about something in the post it is a great opportunity to open it up for discussion with my other readers too.

2. Do you think at times people leave comments that are insincere or not well thought out? Of course. I know a few times I’ve wanted to say something about a post I read, but when I go to comment everything I want to say doesn’t come out as a complete thought. How do you talk about the great pictures, amazing content, cute shoes, and liking how the blogger changed around the furniture in there normal photo spot all at one time?


3. Would you ever leave a comment that could be considered negative?
Not intentionally. However, sarcasm and joking attitudes don’t come across in text very well. I’m sure something I’ve said/will say may be taken out of context and sound rude.

4. Most people claim to like constructive criticism. Do you really and
how do you offer that kind of criticism to others?
I love constructive criticism. As a dancer criticism is important to developing my art. You can never get better without a teacher, and sometimes constructive criticism from my peers is the only teacher I have. I apply that same principle to my blog.

5. Some bloggers don’t allow comments in order to cut down on
negativity. Do you think that is the way to go or are there other ways
to deal with the negative vibes?
  I don’t think not allowing comments is the only way to go. I think you can also not allow anonymous comments. People aren’t as likely to say something mean if they have to put there name to it. I also think that as a blogger you are putting yourself out there to be seen and heard. People aren’t always going to like what you have to say, and you may have to be the bigger person and take it all with a grain of salt.
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6 thoughts on “Friend Friday: What’s in a comment?

  1. You are soooo right about sarcasm not going over in written form. I've had more than a few scuffles in my personal correspondence because of this. I try not to write anything snarky anymore.♥ Vhttp://www.gritandglamour.comtwitter: @gritandglamour

  2. "I love constructive criticism. As a dancer criticism is important to developing my art."I've found the most constructive criticism I get has been in dance instruction or instruction in other physical activities because you can more immediately correct your technique and see the benefits on your performance. In other contexts you can feel like what you need to do to improve may not be within your immediate control and it can be disempowering.I agree with you about trying to convey sarcasm and humour in email/text. It can seriously backfire!

  3. >You are soooo right about sarcasm not going over in written form. I've had more than a few scuffles in my personal correspondence because of this. I try not to write anything snarky anymore.♥ Vhttp://www.gritandglamour.comtwitter: @gritandglamour

Tell me what is on your mind. You can always email me too. danie@noguiltfashion.com

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